Joint project of “Global Vets Aid” and GSPSA for Strays in Georgia

The “Georgian Society for the Protection and Safety of Animals” and Global Vets Aid’ plan to implement a joint project to help stray animals in Georgia. The first phase of the project was supposed to take place in September, but the epidemic caused by Covid-19, unfortunately, led to its temporary postponement.

The project will definitely be implemented and will not take on a one-time nature. The program focuses on the regions because the presence of stray animals, their state of health, and the issue of unruly populations there is much more difficult. TNR programs, vaccinations, and antiparasitic prevention measures are not available to them, which leads to the spread of disease and population control.

Organizations that help animals in the most vulnerable countries are in the minority, unlike organizations that focus on helping people. Therefore, any project that arises in this regard is of particular importance, “Global Vets Aid” being one of them. This non-profit organization, the Association of Veterinarians, formed in 2019, consists of a group of veterinarians from different parts of Spain. Their goal is to implement projects in countries where the presence of stray animals (dogs/cats) is particularly difficult.

Article published by Almudena Alameda on elDiario.es: ‘Lack of tourists caused by COVID-19 has a negative impact on stray animals in Georgia.’

Spanish veterinarians plan to help homeless pets on the streets of Georgia through ‘Global Vets Aid”, which has become even more urgent under COVID-19.

“Our goal is to help animals that are left on the street without veterinary care and proper conditions, which endangers both their lives and human lives. “We primarily perform sterilization, castration, rabies vaccination, and antiparasitic treatment to prevent some of the most common zoonoses, such as leishmaniasis, heartworms, or digestive parasites.”.

In November 2019, Global Vets Aid launched a project in Nepal with the ‘Kathmandu Animal Welfare Center’: “In three weeks, 11 Spanish veterinarians on a trip to Kathmandu performed nearly 100 sterilizations and 415 rabies vaccinations on street animals. In addition, we were able to send abundant medicines and clinical materials, as well as participated in three school educational programs, “- explains Garcia Aguilera.